Research and Investigative Reporting

The Color of Money: The 2004 Presidential Race
Paybacks: How the White House and Congress are Neglecting Our Health Care Because of Their Corporate Contributors
Color of Money
Paybacks: Policies, Patrons, and Personnel
Clean Money Comparisons
Revitalizing Democracy
Buy Now, Save Later
Hard Facts on Hard Money
The Money Trail: Automotive Industry Campaign Contributions
Mothers, Money, and Politics: How Campaign Money Affects Issues Mothers Care About
Paying – and Polluting – More at the Gas Pump
Whoever Wins, They Win: Double-Giving in the Presidential Campaign
Golden Leashes
The Color of Money: The 2004 Presidential Race

“The Color of Money: The 2004 Presidential Race” shows that during the primary season, only 10% of the large individual contributions (more than $200) flowing to the Bush and Kerry campaigns, as well as most of the other major Democratic candidates for the presidency, came from neighborhoods where people of color are the majority. See where the money flowed in your neighborhood by clicking here.

Paybacks: The How the White House and Congress are Neglecting Our Health Care Because of Their Corporate Contributors
Health care related interests have poured more than $163 million into federal political campaigns and party coffers since 1999 and have reaped huge policy paybacks that are harmful to ordinary people’s health, according to a new investigative report by Public Campaign, PAYBACKS: How the White House and Congress are Neglecting Our Health Care Because of Their Corporate Contributors. More…

Color of Money
Campaign money — not votes — is now the currency of our democracy, determining who runs for office, who wins, and who has the ear of elected officials. The candidate who raises the most campaign cash, more often than not, goes on to win the election.

Where does that money come from? The great amounts of cash come from neighborhoods where wealthy, non-Hispanic white populations dominate. Neighborhoods where African Americans and Latinos live are particularly underrepresented in terms of campaign dollars.

The Color of Money Project is devoted to illustrating this unfortunate fact–how a tiny elite group of privileged donors is more equal than others, and how there are direct consequences for people’s lives, from the wages they earn and the taxes they pay, to the quality of the schools their children attend and the air they breathe. We will demonstrate how Clean Money/Clean Elections campaign finance reform restores the American ideal of one person, one vote, and helps knock down barriers to participation in our
democracy. Learn more by going to www.ColorOfMoney.org

Paybacks: Policies, Patrons, and Personnel
Study shows strong correlation between big corporate contributions to the Bush-Cheney campaign and Republican National Committee (RNC) and Bush administration energy policy paybacks that benefit these special interests. More…

Clean Money Comparisons
The purpose of Clean Money Comparisons is to provide a resource for both citizens and legislators who want to go beyond the usual piecemeal campaign finance reform and instead draft comprehensive “Clean Money/Clean Elections” legislation based on the principle that public elections should be publicly financed. This revised edition includes descriptions of the key provisions of Public Campaign’s Clean Money/Clean Elections “Model Bill” and Clean Money/Clean Elections legislation that has been introduced in nine states, one city, and the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. More…

Revitalizing Democracy
“Revitalizing Democracy,” new 48-page report just out from the Money and Politics Implementation Project and Northeast Action [click here to get the full text in pdf format] takes a detailed look at the workings of Clean Elections in Maine, Arizona and Vermont, and the results are inspiring.

Click here to download the executive summary
Click here to download the entire study (located on NorthEast Action’s website)
Buy Now, Save Later
Released in November 2001 and a joint project of Public Campaign and Citizens for Tax Justice, the study examines campaign contribution records of top tax avoiding companies — 41 corporations that enjoyed more than $55 billion in tax breaks between 1996 and 1998, including 23 companies that received tax rebates in 1998. This short list of profitable tax-avoiders — essentially, the companies that are the best at working the system to avoid paying taxes — includes many household names, companies such as General Electric, Microsoft, and Walt Disney. More…
Hard Facts On Hard Money
Released in March 2001, the report gives an overview of hard money: what it is, who gives it, and how political fundraising might be affected if hard money limits were increased. It updates the Public Campaign report Hard Facts: Hard Money in the 2000 Elections (October 2000) which was based largely on data from the first 18 months of the 2000 election cycle. In this report, 2000 election cycle data includes contributions from January 1, 1999 through December 31, 2000, the full election cycle, as reported to the Federal Elections Commission. More…

Hard Facts: Hard Money in the 2000 Elections
Washington, DC…For every one soft dollar raised by national political parties in the 2000 federal elections, nearly five hard dollars have been raised by parties and federal candidates: $256 million in party soft money versus $1.3 billion in hard, according to a new report by Public Campaign, Hard Facts: Hard Money in the 2000 Elections. More…

The Money Trail: Automotive Industry Campaign Contributions
More than 100 people are dead and more than 400 injured in accidents involving Firestone tires on Ford Explorers. News of these tragic deaths is horrifying enough – but what is worse is learning that perhaps they could have been prevented.

The federal agency charged with overseeing auto safety, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been ground down by a Congress fueled by campaign contributions from the automotive industry, which has given candidates and parties more than $55 million since 1990, according to Federal Election Commission data analyzed by the Center for Responsive Politics. More…

Mothers, Money, and Politics: How Campaign Money Affects Issues Mothers Care About
The report explores the systemic problems that lead to poor treatment of women’s concerns in politics. Women make up 51 percent of the population, yet only 12 percent of the Members of Congress are women. More…

Paying – and Polluting – More at the Gas Pump
An analysis showing that senators who voted last fall to stall new fuel efficiency standards for light trucks – a category which includes popular SUVs and minivans – received more than twice the campaign contributions, on average, from the auto lobby as senators who did not. More…

Whoever Wins, They Win: Double-Giving in the Presidential Campaign
An analysis double-giving in the presidential campaigns showing that forty-seven companies and organizations that appear on the donor list of three or more presidential candidates gave at least $50,000 overall. Forty-five of these companies are playing the entire field, showing up on all four of the front-runners’ donor lists. More…

Golden Leashes
The Golden Leash is a symbol of the ties between special interest money and elected officials. It is awarded to Members of Congress who demonstrate egregious conduct in the quid pro quo practice of dollar democracy. More…